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Train Robbery

Any number can play this game which is played outdoors.
It is best if there are plenty of shrubs or other possible
natural barriers to be used as temporary hiding places.
A certain object (picnic table, swing set, etc.) is chosen
to be the train. One player is the train's engineer.
All players carry a toy gun or a stick that resembles one.
The engineer takes his place on the train, closes his eyes,
and counts to ten, while all of the other players ("robbers")
disappear from view. Each robber then plans his own route of
attack (how he will sneak up on and rob the train).
The key is to use bushes, trees, ditches, etc. as cover.
The train conductor must keep an ever watchful eye for
possible robbers. This means he must try to keep careful
surveillance on all approaches to the train.
If he sees one of the robbers he yells, "Bang, Bang,"
followed by the person's name. That robber must then fall
to the ground and count to 30, before proceeding with his
attack. However, the robbers can also shoot the engineer,
and give themselves the extra time to get to the train.
The game is over when one of the robbers successfully
wounds the engineer and gets aboard the train. Once
a robber does this, he becomes the new engineer, and
the game starts all over again.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; HEMLOCK

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Dramatic

Date learned: 00001980S

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