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Your search for BUILDING returned 34 results.

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RIDDLE

Q: WHAT BUILDING HAS THE MOST STORIES?
A: LIBRARY

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDING (A) ; BUILDING - LIBRARY (Q) ; LITERAL NONOPPOSITIONAL

Subject headings: RIDDLE -- Riddle Question

Date learned: 00-00-1955

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Language: Games

Q: I STAND ALONE UPON A ROCK/ THE ANGRY WAVES I DAILY MOCK/
THE SHIPS THAT PASS ME IN (THE) NIGHT/ ARE SAFELY GUIDED BY MY LIGHT
A: A LIGHTHOUSE.

Data entry tech comment:

Updated and Motifs / 02-28-2011 / TRD

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDING ; GAME ; Guide ; Language ; LIGHT ; Lighthouse ; Night ; RHYME ; RIDDLE ; Rock ; Ship ; TRANSPORTATION ; VERSE

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 10-00-1967

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LAKE, STREET, HIGHWAY

Q: WHAT IS A LAKE WITHOUT WATER?/ WHAT IS A STREET WITHOUT HOUSES?/
WHAT IS A HIGHWAY WITHOUT CARS?
A: MAP

Submitter comment: INFORMANT LEARNED THIS FROM HER GRANDMOTHER IN GRAND RAPIDS.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDING (Q) ; NATURAL PHENOMENA (Q) ; TRANSPORTATION (Q)

James Callow Keyword(s): CATCH ; INITIAL ITERATION

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle C890.400
RIDDLE -- Riddle Question

Date learned: 07-00-1964

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RIDDLE

Q: IN MARBLE HALLS AS WHITE AS MILK
LINES (LINED) WITH SKIN AS SOFT AS SKIN. (SILK)
WITH A FOUNTAIN CRYSTAL CLEAR,
A GOLDEN APPLE DOTH APPEAR.
NO DOORS ARE THERE TO THIS STRONGHOLD,
YET THIEVES BREAK IN AND STEAL THE GOLD.
A: AN EGG.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; WARREN

Keyword(s): BUILDINGS (Q) ; EATABLE (Q) ; EATABLES AND DRINKS (A) ; PERSONS (Q)

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 02-22-1970

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MARBLE WALLS - RIDDLE

Q: IN MARBLE WALLS AS WHITE AS MILK,/ LINED WITH A SKIN AS SOFT AS
SILK,/ WITHIN A FOUNTAIN CRYSTAL CLEAR/ A GOLDEN APPLE DOTH APPEAR./
NO DOORS THERE ARE TO THIS STRONGHOLD,/ YET THIEVES BREAK IN AND
STEAL THE GOLD.
A: AN EGG.

Submitter comment: I FOUND THIS IN AN OLD MOTHER GOOSE COLORING BOOK WHICH WAS IN THE
ATTIC. THE COVER AND SOME PAGES WERE MISSING. IT IS AT LEAST TEN
YEARS OLD.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDING (Q) ; MONETARY (Q) ; NATURAL PHENOMENA (Q) COLOR

James Callow Keyword(s): INVERSION ; SYNTAX

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 08-00-1964

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THERE WAS A LITTLE GREEN HOUSE - RIDDLE

Q: THERE WAS A LITTLE GREEN HOUSE,/ AND IN THE LITTLE GREEN HOUSE/
THERE WAS A LITTLE BROWN HOUSE,/ AND IN THE LITTLE BROWN HOUSE/
THERE WAS A LITTLE YELLOW HOUSE,/ AND IN THE LITTLE YELLOW HOUSE/
THERE WAS A LITTLE WHITE HOUSE,/ AND IN THE LITTLE WHITE HOUSE/
THERE WAS A LITTLE HEART.
A: A WALNUT.

Submitter comment: I FOUND THIS IN AN OLD MOTHER GOOSE COLORING BOOK WHICH WAS IN THE
ATTIC. THE COVER AND SOME PAGES WERE MISSING. IT IS AT LEAST TEN
YEARS OLD.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDINGS (Q) COLOR ; EATABLES AND DRINKS ; PART OF THE BODY (Q)

James Callow Keyword(s): CUMULATIVE VERSE ; INITIAL ITERATION ; MEDIAL ITERATION

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 08-00-1964

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TRUE RIDDLE

Q: UP ON A HILL IS A GREEN HOUSE,
IN THE GREEN HOUSE IS A WHITE HOUSE,
IN THE WHITE HOUSE IS A RED HOUSE WITH A LOT OF COLORED BABIES,
WHAT IS IT?
A: A WATERMELON.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; WARREN

Keyword(s): ACTIONS (Q) ; BUILDINGS (Q) ; EATABLES AND DRINKS (A) ; PERSONS (Q)

James Callow Keyword(s): CUMULATIVE VERSE ; FINAL ITERATION ; INITIAL ITERATION

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle C890.400
RIDDLE -- Riddle Question

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TRUE RIDDLE

Q: A HOUSEFUL, A HOLE FULL; YOU CANNOT CATCH A BOWLFULL.
A: SMOKE

Where learned: NOT GIVEN BY COLLECTOR

Keyword(s): BUILDING (Q) ; NATURAL ; NATURAL PHENOMENA (Q) ; UTENSIL (Q)

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 10-12-1965

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TRUE RIDDLE

Q: A HOUSEFUL, A SPOONFUL,/ YOU CAN'T CATCH A SPOONFUL.
A: SMOKE.

Submitter comment: INFORMANT BELIEVES SHE HEARD IT FROM HER SON WHEN HE WAS ATTENDING
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AT LEAST FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. SHE ALSO REMEMBERS
IT BEING REPEATED BY A CUB SCOUT WHILE SHE WAS DEN MOTHER ABOUT
1956.

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): ACTIONS (Q) ; BUILDINGS (Q) ; NATURAL PHENOMENA (A) ; UTENSILS (Q)

James Callow Keyword(s): ROOMFUL?

Subject headings: Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 10-20-1971

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( 20 ) RIDDLES

Q: 1. DUI SESLES PER KALNELIZ NESOEINA. - TWO SISTERS DO NOT MEET
OVER A HILL.
A: EYES.
Q: 2. DU RATU PAGIRY STOUI. - TWO WHEELS STANDING BY THE FOREST.
A: EARS.
Q: 3. PILNA LUKTELE BALTEZ VISTELIZ. - A HOUSE FULL OF WHITE HENS.
A: MOUTH AND TEETH.
Q: 4. MIZSLIUZ TEVAS KALNE GULI. - THE FATHER OF RIDDLES IS LYING
IN THE HILL.
A: TONGUE.
Q: 5. ZIBA DIENA, ZIBA NAKTIZ. - SPARKLES AT NIGHT, SPARKLES DURING
THE DAY.
A: WINDOW.
Q: 6. VISI JODO, NIEKAS NEPASERIA. - EVERYONE FOR IODINE, NO ONE
FEEDS IT.
A: DOOR STEP.
Q: 7. NEI PATI VDGO, NEI KITAM DUODA. - NEITHER DOES SHE EAT HERSELF,
OR GIVE TO ANOTHER.
A: A LOCK.
Q: 8. MASA MOTERELE VISAZ PASAULIZ APRENGIA. - A SMALL WOMAN DRESSES
THE WHOLE WORLD.
A: A SEWING NEEDLE.
Q: 9. MAZAS PUODELIS, SKANI KOSELE. - A SMALL POT, GOOD BROTH.
A: PEANUT. ?M Q: 10. PRAMUSI LEDAZ, RASI SIDABRAZ; PRAMUSI SIDABRAZ, RASI AUKSAZ. -
BREAK THE ICE, YOU'LL FIND SILVER; BREAK THE SILVER, YOU'LL FIND
GOLD.
A: AN EGG.
Q: 11. DVIEM PUPOM VISAZ LAUKAZ APSEJA. - WITH TWO PEAS YOU SOW A
WHOLE FIELD.
A: WITH EYES.
Q: 12. DU BEGA, DU VEJA. - TWO RUN, TWO CHASE.
A: WHEELS.
Q: 13. ATLEKE PAUKSTIS BE SPARNUZ, IZKANDO ZINOQUI BE DANTUZ. - A
BIRD FLEW BY WITH NO WINGS, BIT A MAN WITH NO TEETH.
A: BULLET.
Q: 14. SUDEGE AZUOLAS BE ANGLIUZ, BE PELENIZ. - AN OAK BURNED WITH
NO COAL, WITH NO ASHES.
A: A CANDLE
Q: 15. MISKE GIMEZS, IMSKE ANGES, PAREINA NAMO KEPUIUZ KILNOTI. -
BORN IN A FOREST, GREW UP IN A FOREST, COMES HOME TO RAISE HATS.
A: CROSS.
Q: 16. ILGAS - BE GALO, GILUS - BE DUGNO. - LONG - WITH NO END, DEEP
- WITH NO BOTTOM.
A: A RING.
Q: 17. PENKI TVARTAI, VIENOS DURYS. - FIRE BURNS, ONE DOOR.
A: GLOVES.
Q: 18. PER VANDENIZ EIDAMAS NEPRIQERIA, PER UGNIZ - NESUDEGA.
WALKING THROUGH WATER, DOESN'T DROWN; THROUGH FIRE - DOESN'T BURN.
A: A SHADOW.
Q: 19. JOKI ZIRGAS ZVENGIA, NET KAMANOS SKAMBA. - FAR DOES A HORSE
NEIGH, EVEN THE ROOF TOPS ECHO.
A: THUNDER.
Q: 20. KAD ATSIKELTUZ, DANGEZ PAREMTUZ, KAD RENKAS TURETUZ, VAGIZ
PAGAUTUZ. - IF COULD GET UP, HOLD UP THE HEAVEN; IF HAD HANDS,
WOULD CATCH A THIEF.
A: A ROAD.

Submitter comment: IN LITHUANIAN, THESE RIDDLES RHYME. HOWEVER, THE TRANSLATION DOES NOT
BRING OUT THE TRUE AND REAL RHYTHM OF THEM.

Where learned: NOT GIVEN BY COLLECTOR

Keyword(s): ACTIONS (Q) ; ANIMALS (Q) ; BUILDINGS (Q) ; HARDWARE (Q) ; NATURAL

Subject headings: Favorites
Ballad Song Dance Game Music Verse -- Riddle True Riddle

Date learned: 03-24-1972

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TRADITIONAL OCCUPATION

THE VAST MAJORITY OF THE STRUCTURAL STEEL WORKERS
IN NEW YORK CITY WHO WORK ON THE FRAMING FOR SKY-
SCRAPERS, ARE NAVAJO INDIANS WHO BECAUSE OF AN INBORN
SENSE OF BALANCE HAVE PASSED THIS HAZARDOUS JOB
DOWN FROM FATHER TO SON.

Where learned: NEW YORK CITY

James Callow Keyword(s): BUILDING TRADES ; SKYSCRAPERS.

Subject headings: CUSTOM FESTIVAL -- Work Commerce Business

Date learned: 00-00-1967

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LEAVING

ON LEAVING THE HOUSE YOU ARE TO LEAVE BY THE SAME DOOR YOU
ENTERED THE HOUSE BY OR ELSE BAD LUCK WILL COME TO YOU.

Submitter comment:

INFORMANT DOES THIS EACH TIME HE ENTERS A BUILDING. HE
ALWAYS LEAVES BY THE SAME DOOR ENTERED.

Data entry tech comment:

Updated by TRD

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BELIEF ; BUILDING ; Entrance ; Exit ; LUCK ; SUPERSTITION

James Callow Keyword(s): DIRECTION ; POSITION

Subject headings: BELIEF -- Street Trip Relations between relatives, friends, host and guest Social class Rank
BELIEF -- Bad luck

Date learned: 02-28-1971

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OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, IS A
QUAINT LITTLE CHURCH LOCATED ON LANCASTER AVENUE AT 63RD STREET.
THE TRADITION AROUND THERE IS THAT THIS CHURCH WAS BUILT BY ALL
THE MAIDS OF THE SURROUNDING RICH FAMILIES (ALTHOUGH IT IS NO
LONGER A RICH SECTION). IT WAS TO BE JUST THEIR OWN LITTLE
CHURCH, BUT IT IS EVEN USED TODAY (AND BY EVERYBODY).

Data entry tech comment:

Updated by TRD

Where learned: MICHIGAN ; DETROIT

Keyword(s): BUILDING ; CREATION ; Legend ; Origin

Subject headings: CUSTOM FESTIVAL -- Church
ART CRAFT ARCHITECTURE -- Holy placeChurchTemple

Date learned: 10-28-1968

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{ FAMILY SAGA }

MY GRANDPARENTS CAME FROM GERMANY, FROM WESTFALEN
AND HANOVER, MIGRATED TO THE CENTRAL AND NORTHERN
PART OF MINNESOTA TO FIND A BETTER LIFE FOR THEM-
SELVES. THE LIFE IN EUROPE WAS UNBEARABLE SINCE
THE LOWER CLASS WAS HELD DOWN WITH NO CHANCE TO
IMPROVE THEIR STATUS IN LIFE. MANY OTHERS HAD
ALREADY SETTLED IN NORTH CENTRAL U.S. UNDER THE
"HOMESTEAD ACT," WHERE A FAMILY COULD CULTIVATE AN
AREA OF LAND, 160 ACRES OR LESS, WITHOUT COST, LIVE
ON THE LAND AND CLAIM OWNERSHIP TO IT.
THESE PEOPLE IN THIS AREA CAME FROM THE SAME GENERAL
AREA IN EUROPE, SPOKE THE SAME LANGUAGE AND THE SAME
CULTURAL BACKGROUND TRYING TO IMPROVE THEIR LIFE WITH
LITTLE MONETARY CAPITAL TO START WITH. THEY DID NOT
TRAVEL FIRST CLASS. THEY HAD A LITTLE MORE THAN THE
CLOTHES ON THEIR BACK. ONCE THEY ARRIVED IN MINNESOTA
THE NEIGHBORS ALL WORKED TOGETHER BUILDING A LOG CABIN
AND SHARING WHAT THEY HAD.
INDIANS FREQUENTLY STRAYED THROUGH THE FARM AREA
LOOKING IN THE WINDOW OF THE LOG CABIN. WILD ANIMALS
WERE IN EVIDENCE AND WOULD FREQUENTLY ATTACK SMALLER
FARM ANIMALS. WITH EACH YEAR AS THEY EARNED A LITTLE
MONEY, THEY IMPROVED THEIR LIVING STANDARDS BY BUILDING
A BETTER AND OBTAINING MACHINERY TO HELP MAKE A
LIVING AND LATER ON SOME NEW BUILDINGS WERE ADDED.
MY MOTHER WAS THE OLDEST OF SEVEN CHILDREN. SHE WAS
NINE YEARS OLD WHEN MY GRANDPARENTS MIGRATED TO
AMERICA. MY FATHER WAS BORN IN MINNESOTA THE ONLY
SURVIVING CHILD, A TWIN. HIS YOUNGER DAYS WERE SPENT
IN A ONE ROOM LOG CABIN, WHICH LATER BECAME A SEVEN
ROOM HOUSE WITH BASEMENT AND ATTIC AS TIMES IMPROVED
ECONOMICALLY FOR THEM.
TRANSPORTATION WAS BY HORSE AND BUGGY OR ON FOOT.
THEREFORE, PEOPLE COMMUNICATED ONLY WITH OTHERS LIVING
WITHIN THE RADIUS OF A FEW MILES. MY MOTHER MARRIED
MY FATHER AT THE AGE OF 18. BEING NEIGHBORS, IT WAS
EASY FOR THEM TO BECOME ACQUAINTED.
THE BEGINNING WAS DIFFICULT, HAVING NO MODERN CONVEN-
IENCES. THE DAY BEGAN WITH RISING AT 5 A.M. DOING
CHORES, WHICH CONSISTED OF MILKING ABOUT 30 COWS,
POURING THE MILK IN 10 GALLON CANS, HAULING THE MILK TO
THE MILK HOUSE, RUNNING IT THROUGH THE SEPARATOR TO
SEPARATE THE CREAM FROM THE MILK AND STORING IT IN COLD
WATER UNTIL THE CREAM WAS HAULED TO THE CREAMERY TO BE
MADE INTO BUTTER. THE SKIM MILK WAS FED TO THE HOGS
TOGETHER WITH OTHER CEREALS AND CORN. THEN BREAKFAST
WAS SERVED. AFTER BREAKFAST THE MEN WOULD FEED THE
CATTLE, CLEAN THE BARN, DO WHATEVER FIELD WORK WAS
REQUIRED FOR THE DAY. PLOWING, CULTIVATING, SEEDING,
MAKING HAY BY CUTTING GRASS AND DRYING IT, OR HARVEST-
ING. MOTHER WOULD HAVE CLEAN UP WORK, LIKE WASHING THE
SEPARATOR, FEEDING THE CHICKENS, COLLECTING EGGS, WASHING
IRONING AND MENDING CLOTHES AND GENERAL CARE OF THE
HOUSE, FOOD, AND CHILDREN. IT WAS ALSO HER JOB TO SEED
THE GARDEN AND KEEP IT WEED FREE. CAN ENOUGH FOOD TO
LAST THROUGH THE WINTER. GENERALLY CARE FOR ALL FOOD
PREPARATION AND STORAGE.
BECAUSE OF NECESSITY TO SURVIVE IN REMOTE AREAS, MY
PARENTS HAD TO BE RESOURCEFUL, GROW THEIR OWN VEGETABLES,
FRUITS AND GRAINS, RAISE THEIR OWN MEAT AND PROCESS
IT THE BEST WAY THAT THEY KNEW HOW. MY GRANDPARENTS
STARTED A LARGE APPLE, PLUM AND CHERRY ORCHARD WHICH
SERVED OUR FAMILY WELL AND LEFT SOME TO SELL. THE
APPLES WERE PICKED OFF THE TREES IN THE FALL, WRAPPED
IN PIECES OF NEWSPAPER AND STORED IN BARRELS OR BOXES
IN THE BASEMENT TO BE USED IN THE WINTER MONTHS. APPLE
SLICES WERE DRIED ON STRINGS, APPLE SAUCE, APPLE BUTTER
AND APPLE CIDER WAS ALSO MADE AND STORED. THE CHILDREN
WOULD SIT IN THE APPLE ORCHARD ON OCCASION AND SELL
APPLES TO ROAD WORKERS GOING BY, TWO APPLES FOR 5 CENTS.
IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ORCHARD, WE ALSO CONTAINED A BEE
HIVE TO GIVE US A LITTLE HONEY EVERY FALL. AT TIMES,
DAD WOULD GO LOOK FOR BEE HIVES IN THE WOODED AREAS.
WHEN HE WOULD FIND ONE, HE WOULD SMOKE THE BEES OUT WITH
SULPHUR AND BRING SEVERAL GALLONS OF HONEY FOR THE
FAMILY.
THE POTATOES WERE PLANTED ON THE FIELDS, DUG WITH PITCH
FORKS BY HAND, PICKED AND THROWN ON TO A WAGON, HAULED
INTO THE BASEMENT AND STORED FOR WINTER USE. THE WHEAT
OATS, AND BARLEY WERE HAULED TO THE LOCAL GRAINERY TO
BE PROCESSED INTO FLOUR AND CEREALS. HOWEVER, ENOUGH
GRAINS WERE HELD BACK TO FEED CATTLE AND CHICKENS. MOTHER
ALWAYS USED GRAHAM OR WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR IN THE BREAD
FLOUR WHEN BAKING BREAD. ALL FOODS THAT HAD TO BE
PURCHASED FROM THE LOCAL STORE, WAS PURCHASED IN LARGE
QUANTITIES IN ORDER TO MAKE IT LESS EXPENSIVE. FLOUR
BY THE 100 LB. SACK, OATMEAL BY THE 100 LB. SACK, 5
GALLON CANS OF SYRUP TO BE USED ON BREAD, INSTEAD OF
BUTTER, BECAUSE BUTTER HAD TO BE SOLD, IT WAS TOO
EXPENSIVE. BEEF AND HOGS WERE SLAUGHTERED AS THE NEED
EXISTED TO SUPPLY US WITH FOOD. THIS WAS DONE COOPERA-
TIVELY WITH OTHER NEIGHBORS IN ORDER TO MAKE IT EASIER.
VEGETABLES, SUCH AS CARROTS, TURNIPS, BEETS, RUTEBAGAS,
PUMPKIN MELONS, WERE STORED IN THE BASEMENT. THE ROOT
VEGETABLES WERE PACKED IN SAND TO KEEP THEM AIRTIGHT.
ALL TYPES OF BERRIES AND NUTS WERE PICKED IN THE WOODS
AND CANNED.
SOMETIMES, WE WOULD HAVE A LITTLE VARIETY AFTER THE BOYS
RETURNED FROM A HUNTING VENTURE IN THE NEAR WOODED AREA.
PHEASANT, VENISON, QUAIL, YOUNG PIGEONS, WILD TURKEY,
GEESE OR DUCK, JACKRABBIT WERE ALL USED AND MADE PART OF
OUR DIET WHEN AVAILABLE.
THERE WERE OTHER AREAS WHERE THRIFT AND SELF HELP WAS
OUR WAY OF LIFE. IN THE WINTER TIME, JANUARY AND
FEBRUARY, THE MEN WOULD CUT BLOCKS OF ICE, SEVERAL
FEET SQUARE, FROM THE NEARBY FROZEN LAKES, HAUL
IT HOME AND PACK IT IN SAWDUST IN OUR SMALL ICEHOUSE,
TO BE USED DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS. HOWEVER, IT ONLY
LASTED ABOUT HALF OF THE SUMMER. A BLOCK OF ICE WAS
PLACED IN AN ICEBOX, WHICH WAS ABOUT THE SIZE OF A SMALL
REFRIGERATOR, IN THE HOUSE. IT WOULD COOL THE INSIDE
AND THE MELTED ICE WATER WAS COLLECTED AT THE BOTTOM.
THE ICEBOX WATER PAN HAD TO BE EMPTIED EVERY FEW HOURS,
IF YOU WANTED TO AVOID MOPPING UP THE FLOOR.
DOING THE FAMILY LAUNDRY WAS AN ALL DAY CHORE. THE
ONLY LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT WAS A LARGE WATER BOILER, WHICH
WAS PLACED ON TOP OF A COOKSTOVE FILLED WITH RAIN WATER
AND BROUGHT TO A BOIL. ONE LARGE CAKE OF SOAP 3 X 5
INCHES WAS SHAVED AND ADDED TO THE WATER. THE SOILED
CLOTHING WAS RUBBED ON A CORRUGATED WASHBOARD THEN PLACED
IN THIS WASH BOILER AND BOILED FOR ABOUT 30 MINUTES.
WHILE IT WAS BOILING, A CLOTHES STOMPER, WHICH LOOKED
LIKE AN OVERSIZED PLUNGER WITH LONG HANDLE, WAS USED
TO STOMP THE CLOTHES AND MOVE THE CLOTHES AROUND IN A
SIMILAR MANNER AS THE MODERN WASHING MACHINE DOES.
AFTER 30 MINUTES OF THIS ACTIVITY, THE CLOTHES WERE
PLACED IN TWO RINSE WATERS IN TWO LARGE GALVANIZED TUBS,
THEN RAN THROUGH A HAND WRINGER AND HUNG ON THE LINE OUT-
DOORS.
THE SOFT WATER WHICH WAS USED FOR WASHING CLOTHES WAS
COLLECTED FROM THE ROOF OF THE HOUSE THROUGH EAVES
WHICH LED THE WATER INTO A LARGE CISTERN WHICH WAS
LOCATED UNDER THE KITCHEN FLOOR. AN OLD HAND PUMP
PLACED OVER AN ALL-PURPOSE KITCHEN SINK WAS USED TO
PUMP THE WATER OUT OF THE CISTERN.
THE DRINKING WATER WAS OBTAINED FROM A WELL OUTSIDE
WHICH ALSO HAD TO BE PUMPED BY HAND. WHEN A BELT WAS
ATTACHED TO THIS PUMP, {IT} COULD BE MADE TO OPERATE BY
USING THE WINDMILL. THE WIND WOULD MOVE A LARGE WHEEL,
WHICH WAS ABOUT 100 FT. IN THE AIR AND THE POWER WOULD
PUMP THE WATER AUTOMATICALLY, WHICH WAS VERY HANDY FOR
FILLING A LARGE TANK OF WATER FOR THE CATTLE.
WHEN GEESE WERE KILLED FOR FOOD, THE FEATHERS WERE USED
FOR MAKING PILLOWS, ALSO SOME CHICKEN FEATHERS WERE
USED.
THE CORN SHUCKS WERE DRIED AND USED IN MAKING
MATTRESSES FOR THE BEDS.
WOOL FROM THE SHEEP WAS GATHERED, CLEANED AND CARDED
AND SPUN ON THE SPINNING WHEEL, THEN USED FOR MAKING
HOSE, MITTENS AND SWEATHERS, AND SCARFS AND MENDING
YARN.
THE NEIGHBORS OFTEN HAD QUILTING PARTIES. A LARGE
PIECE OF CLOTH WAS STRETCHED ON A FRAME ABOUT THE SIZE
OF A DOUBLE BED. A LAYER OF CLEAN AND CARDED WOOL WAS
PLACED ON THIS CLOTH. ANOTHER PIECE OF CLOTH WAS
PLACED OVER THIS AND THEN THE LADIES WOULD STITCH THE
LAYERS TOGETHER, WHICH TURNED OUT TO BE A WARM QUILT
FOR THE BED.
THE ROOMS IN THE HOUSE WERE KEPT WARM WITH SEVERAL
STOVES. A LARGE WOODSTOVE IN THE KITCHEN SERVED FOR
PREPARING MEALS AND KEPT THE KITCHEN WARM. A FURNACE
IN THE BASEMENT WHICH DIRECTED THE HEAT THROUGH A
FAIRLY LARGE OPENING, 3 FEET BY 3 FEET IN THE FLOOR OF
THE DINING ROOM, KEPT THE OTHER AREAS OF THE HOUSE
FAIRLY WARM. AN AIR VENT IN THE CEILING OF THE DINING
ROOM WOULD ALLOW SOME HEAT TO GET TO THE UPSTAIRS
SLEEPING ROOMS. THE LIVING ROOM HAD A POT-BELLIED
STOVE TO KEEP THE ROOM COSY AND WARM. ASHES WERE OFTEN
USED TO CLEAN AND SCOUR BURNT KETTLES.

Data entry tech comment:

Updated by TRD

Where learned: ILLINOIS ; PEORIA

Keyword(s): America ; BUILDING ; Chores ; Cloth ; Discovery ; Domestic ; Domesticity ; FAMILY ; Farm ; FARMING ; FOOD ; Machinery ; Migration ; Minnesota ; New World ; Quilt ; Survival

Subject headings: PROSE NARRATIVE -- Tale

Date learned: 11-01-1971

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