Socioeconomic status as a potential moderator for the relationship between coping and social support

Paupert, Jace, Monika J. Sata, and Kristen M. Abraham

  1. analyses were designed to assess whether or not socioeconomic status (SES) acts as a moderator between coping and social support. These data were previously collected as part of a class project for the winter 2016 ReBUILD Detroit health disparities research coordination network course at the University of Detroit Mercy. The sample consisted of 88 participants, all undergraduate students at the University of Detroit Mercy (31.8% male and 68.2% female). Previous studies have indicated that there is a positive correlation between social support and coping (Valentiner, Holahan & Moos, 1994). Studies have also shown that low childhood socioeconomic status may be associated with lower coping skills whereas high childhood socioeconomic status is associated with higher social support (Beatty, Kamarck, Matthews & Shiffman, 2011). Based on these findings it was hypothesized that socioeconomic status (SES) moderates the relationship between social support and active coping such that among individuals with lower socioeconomic status there would be a stronger correlation between social support and active coping as compared to among individuals with a higher socioeconomic status. It was also expected that socioeconomic status would moderate the relationship between social support and avoidant coping such that among individuals with lower SES there would be a stronger negative correlation between social support and avoidant coping as compared to among those of higher SES. In general, the hypotheses were not supported by the results. Regardless of level of socioeconomic status, there were no statistically significant correlations between social support and coping styles. Limitations and implications are discussed.